High Level

Snowboard

Middle Level
Cow
vs

Snowboard is correct spelling Snowboard vs Cow Cow is correct spelling

Definition

Snowboard [ ˈsnoʊˌbɔrd, -ˌboʊrd ]

Snowboards are boards where the users places both feet, usually secured, to the same board. The board itself is wider than most skis, with the ability to glide on snow. Snowboards widths are between 6 and 12 inches or 15 to 30 centimeters. Snowboards are differentiated from monoskis by the stance of the user. In monoskiing, the user stands with feet inline with direction of travel (facing tip of monoski/downhill) (parallel to long axis of board), whereas in snowboarding, users stand with feet transverse (more or less) to the longitude of the board. Users of such equipment may be referred to as snowboarders. Commercial snowboards generally require extra equipment such as bindings and special boots which help secure both feet of a snowboarder, who generally ride in an upright position. These types of boards are commonly used by people at ski hills, mountains, backcountry, or resorts for leisure, entertainment, and competitive purposes in the activity called snowboarding.

noun
  • a board for gliding on snow, resembling a wide ski, to which both feet are secured and that one rides in an upright position Make sure the dimensions of your snowboard meet the competition requirements.
  • to ride a snowboard Of all the places I snowboarded last winter, my favorite was Mammoth Mountain.
  • a board serving as a snow guard.
  • a shaped board, resembling a skateboard without wheels, on which a person can stand to slide across snow

Cow [ kaʊ ]

Cattle (Bos taurus or Bos primigenius taurus), also known as taurine cattle, Eurasian cattle, or European cattle, are large domesticated cloven-hooved herbivores. They are a prominent modern member of the subfamily Bovinae and the most widespread species of the genus Bos. In taxonomy, adult females are referred to as cows and adult males are referred to as bulls. However, since there is no gender-neutral singular form for cattle, in colloquial speech cow is sometimes used as the gender-neutral singular form or as a common name for the species as a whole.

noun
  • the mature female of a bovine animal, especially of the genus Bos.
  • the female of certain other mammals, as elephants, seals, and whales.
  • a domestic bovine of either sex and any age.
  • Slang Disparaging and Offensive.
  • a contemptible woman, especially one who is fat, stupid, lazy, etc. She's an ugly cow.
  • a woman who has a large number of children or is frequently pregnant.
  • have a cow, Slang.
  • to become very angry or upset; throw a fit My mom will have a cow when she hears I'm moving.
  • till / until the cows come home,
Word used in Sentences
  • 1. I'm learning to snowboard at the moment.
  • 2. Snowboard parks are becoming more popular.
  • 3. Most of the areas have snowboard areas and are planning special snowboard events though the season.
  • 4. And Quincy could show him how to snowboard and I could show him how to fly downhill and do bumps.
  • 5. Other snowboard inventors made different kinds of boards.
  • 6. The children love to snowboard in winter.
  • 7. Buying a Snowboard isn't as trouble-free as it used to be.
  • 8. A snowboarder competes during the US Snowboard Grand Prix men's qualifier December 11 in Copper Mountain, Colorado.
  • 9. A wakeboard looks like a snowboard, only shorter and wider.
  • 10. Or you might decide to learn to snowboard, or to practice Hatha yoga.
  • 1. Many a good cow hath a bad calf. 
  • 2. You cannot sell the cow and sup the milk. 
  • 3. Not all butter that the cow yields. 
  • 4. If you sell the cow, you sell her milk too. 
  • 5. Like cow, like calf.
  • 6. The cow knows not what her tail is worth until she has lost it. 
  • 7. The cow that’s first up gets the first of the dew. 
  • 8. She bailed a cow up for milking.
  • 9. It's been a cow of a day.
  • 10. The cow answered to its cowboy's touch.

Word Origin

Snowboard
First recorded in 1980–85; snow + board
Cow
First recorded before 900; Middle English cou, Old English cū; cognate with German Kuh, Dutch koe, Old Norse kȳr, Sanskrit gáuḥ “ox, cow,” Latin bōs “ox, cow,” Greek boûs “ox, cow”; cf. bovine, gaur

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