Elementary Level
Electron
Middle Level
Photon
vs

Electron is correct spelling Electron vs Photon Photon is correct spelling

Definition

Electron [ ΙͺˈlΙ›k trΙ’n ]

The electron is a subatomic particle (denoted by the symbol eβˆ’ or Ξ²βˆ’) whose electric charge is negative one elementary charge.[9] Electrons belong to the first generation of the lepton particle family,[10] and are generally thought to be elementary particles because they have no known components or substructure. The electron has a mass that is approximately 1/1836 that of the proton.[11] Quantum mechanical properties of the electron include an intrinsic angular momentum (spin) of a half-integer value, expressed in units of the reduced Planck constant, Δ§. Being fermions, no two electrons can occupy the same quantum state, in accordance with the Pauli exclusion principle.[10] Like all elementary particles, electrons exhibit properties of both particles and waves: they can collide with other particles and can be diffracted like light. The wave properties of electrons are easier to observe with experiments than those of other particles like neutrons and protons because electrons have a lower mass and hence a longer de Broglie wavelength for a given energy.

noun
  • Also called negatron. Physics, Chemistry.
  • an elementary particle that is a fundamental constituent of matter, having a negative charge of 1.602 Γ— 10βˆ’19 coulombs, a mass of 9.108 Γ— 10βˆ’31 kilograms, and spin of Β½, and existing independently or as the component outside the nucleus of an atom.
  • Electricity.
  • a unit of charge equal to the charge on one electron.
  • a stable elementary particle present in all atoms, orbiting the nucleus in numbers equal to the atomic number of the element in the neutral atom; a lepton with a negative charge of 1.602Β 176Β 462Β Γ—Β 10 –19 coulomb, a rest mass of 9.109Β 381Β 88Β Γ—Β 10 –31 kilogram, a radius of 2.817Β 940Β 285Β Γ—Β 10 –15 metre, and a spin of 1/2
  • A stable subatomic particle in the lepton family having a rest mass of 9.1066 X 10-28 gram and a unit negative electric charge of approximately 1.602 X 10-19 coulomb.
  • A stable elementary particle in the lepton family having a mass at rest of 9.107 X 10-28 grams and a negative electric charge of approximately 1.602 X 10-19 coulombs. Electrons orbit about the positively charged nuclei of atoms in distinct orbitals of different energy levels, called shells. Electrons are the primary charge carriers in electric current. Compare positron. See also electromagnetism elementary particle ion. See Table at subatomic particle.
  • A positron or a negatron.

Photon [ ˈfoʊ tΙ’n ]

The photon (Greek: Ο†αΏΆΟ‚, phōs, light) is a type of elementary particle. It is the quantum of the electromagnetic field, including electromagnetic radiation such as light and radio waves and the force carrier for the electromagnetic force. Photons are massless,[a] so they always move at the speed of light in vacuum, 299792458Β m/s (or about 186,282Β mi/s). The photon belongs to the class of bosons.

noun
  • a quantum of electromagnetic radiation, usually considered as an elementary particle that is its own antiparticle and that has zero rest mass and charge and a spin of one. Symbol Ξ³
  • a quantum of electromagnetic radiation, regarded as a particle with zero rest mass and charge, unit spin, and energy equal to the product of the frequency of the radiation and the Planck constant
  • The quantum of electromagnetic energy, generally regarded as a discrete particle having zero mass, no electric charge, and an indefinitely long lifetime.
  • The subatomic particle that carries the electromagnetic force and is the quantum of electromagnetic radiation. The photon has a rest mass of zero, but has measurable momentum, exhibits deflection by a gravitational field, and can exert a force. It has no electric charge, has an indefinitely long lifetime, and is its own antiparticle. See Note at electromagnetic radiation. See Table at subatomic particle.
Word used in Sentences
  • 1 An electron has a negative charge, a proton has a positive charge.
  • 2 Magnetic coils focus the electron beams into fine spots.
  • 3 He is reading electron physics at Qinghua University.
  • 4 arena, arenas * circus, circuses * electron, electrons.
  • 5 The electron microscope uses a beam of electrons to produce images at high magnifications.
  • 6 This is a consequence of electron spin.
  • 7 How near depends on the electron energy.
  • 8 The school's equipment includes a scanning electron microscope.
  • 9 Fig. 5. Scanning electron micrograph of a diatom.
  • 10 An electron no longer always had a specific location.
  • 1. I have also indicated a photon reaching the earth from a distant star.
  • 2. But here things are very different: each individual photon behaves like a wave entirely on its own!
  • 3. This light is tuned so that the photon energy exactly matches the desired atomic transition energy.
  • 4. The photomultiplier was operated in the single photon counting mode.
  • 5. How can it be that by allowing the photon an alternative route, we have actually stopped it from traversing either route?
  • 6. Photon Cannons, or the little hand thingies.
  • 7. A real or virtual photon may spontaneously annihilate.
  • 8. The photon is the carrier of electromagnetism.
  • 9. Detection of the photon rest mass is dependent on a rotating torsion pendulum method, where the precision of the experimental result is mainly dependent on the amplitude of the modulating signal.
  • 10. The stimulated photon echo in degenerate two-level system has been studied.

Word Origin

Electron
Term first suggested in 1891 by Irish physicist G. J. Stoney (1826–1911); electr(ic) + -on (from the names of charged particles, as ion, cation, anion) with perhaps accidental allusion to Greek αΈ—lektron amber (see electric)
Photon
First recorded in 1900–05; phot- + -on1

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